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Your vs. You’re

Teacher behind the desk

Welcome to another edition of the Teacher’s Desk!  Today we are going to talk about Your and You’re.  I see these two misused quite often around the web.  It really shouldn’t be that difficult to get these two correct.  One is the possessive form of YOU.  The other is a contraction for YOU ARE.  Anyway, here is how you can explain the difference to your students so they can keep them straight.

Your vs. You’re

your – Possessive form of you (typically used before a noun).

Incorrect: You’re piano playing skills have improved!
Correct: Your piano playing skills have improved!

you’re – Contraction of you are.

Incorrect: Your now a piano music master!
Correct: You’re now a piano music master!

Are these words that have been used incorrectly in your homeschool?  What are some others you are hoping I will cover?  Leave me a comment and let me know what words are driving you batty!  Be sure to visit me next week for another set of commonly misused words.

From the Teacher’s Desk-Its vs. It’s

Teacher behind the desk

Welcome to another edition of the Teacher’s Desk!  I realized in the revamping of my blog, that I kind of dropped this feature.  I plan to remedy that right now and make this a weekly feature once again.  Today we are going to discuss  the words Its and It’s.  These seem to be ones that many students mix up and use incorrectly.  Quite frankly, it makes me crazy.  So here is how you can explain the difference so you your students don’t mix them up.

Its vs. It’s

its – Associated with a thing previously mentioned or in reference to an animal without prior knowledge of the animal’s gender.

Incorrect: That ostrich will never be a ballet dancer; it’s posture is horrendous.
Correct: That ostrich will never be a ballet dancer; its posture is horrendous.

it’s – Contraction of it is or it has.

Incorrect: Bob bikes to work. Its his favorite part of the day.
Correct: Bob bikes to work. It’s his favorite part of the day.

Are these words that have been used incorrectly in your homeschool?  What are some others you are hoping I will cover?  Leave me a comment and let me know what words are driving you batty!  Be sure to visit me next week for another set of commonly misused words.

From the Teacher’s Desk-Lose vs. Loose

Welcome to this edition of From the Teacher’s Desk!  Words are wonderful tools, but sometimes we use those tools incorrectly.   For the next several weeks, I will be covering some of the most common misused words in the English language.  My hope is that we can teach our students the correct way to use them and empower them.  Today we are going to discuss the differences between the words Lose and Loose.  Many people use these interchangeably and that is just wrong! These words mean two entirely different things.  Hopefully I can help you straighten out your students today.  Below you will find the nitty gritty of the Lose vs. Loose debate:

Lose vs. Loose

lose – To be deprived of or cease to have; to cause someone to fail to gain or retain something.

Incorrect: Loose weight in 5 weeks or loose your chance to go to the beach!
Correct: Lose weight in 5 weeks or lose your chance to go to the beach!

loose – Not firmly or tightly fixed in place; to release or set free.

Incorrect: The dog’s collar was lose, so Bob tightened it before the dog got lose.
Correct: The dog’s collar was loose, so Bob tightened it before the dog got loose.

Are these words that have been used incorrectly in your homeschool?  What are some others you are hoping I will cover?  Leave me a comment and let me know what words are driving you batty!  Be sure to visit me next week for another set of commonly misused words.

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